US – National Transportation Safety Board News & Reports of the Week – 22 April 2014

A summary of this weeks activity and downloadable files of new reports published by the self-proclaimed, “world’s premier independent agency for accident investigation.”

PRESS RELEASES ISSUED THIS WEEK – 4

AVIATION SAFETY RECOMMENDATION LETTERS ISSUED THIS WEEK – 0

AVIATION MISHAP REPORTS ISSUED THIS WEEK – 600

  • New reports released this week – 56
  • Revised reports released this week – 4

AVIATION PRELIM REPORTS RELEASED THIS WEEK – 24 – AVG LATENCY 22 DAYS

AVIATION FACTUAL REPORTS RELEASED THIS WEEK – 29

  • Field Investigations (NTSB) – 3 (9%) – Avg Latency 811 Days After Event
  • Limited Investigations (delegated to FAA) – 14 (41%) – Avg Latency 300 Days After Event
  • Data collection reports (CA) – 14 (41%) – Avg Latency 139 Days After Event
  • Incident report (IA) – 0 (0%)
  • Other (public use, foreign, etc.) – 3 (9%)
  • Number of factual reports more than one year old issued this week – 10

REPORTS OF PROBABLE CAUSE RELEASED THIS WEEK – 0 NEW – 0 REVISED

SUMMARIES OF NEW REPORTS:

REPORTS OF THE WEEK (See the above links for more details)

This week’s award for worst training aircraft.
Accident Rpt# ERA13LA320 Regis# N788T Pulaski, TN Acft Mk/Mdl THOMPSON BRUCE D SONERAI II

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. A review of the pilot’s logbook revealed that he had logged 120 total hours of flight experience, of which 9 hours were in the accident airplane. He had logged 3 hours in the 90 days prior to the accident, and 28 hours in the year previous to the accident.

In an interview with an FAA inspector, the previous owner explained the flight characteristics of the accident airplane. He detailed the inherent instability of the airplane’s design, the speeds necessary to maintain stable takeoffs and landing approaches, and the airplane’s stall characteristics. The previous owner stated that the airplane required “lots of airspeed” to be stable. He stated 100 mph was his preferred airspeed in the airport traffic pattern, as well as in a climb to facilitate engine cooling. He stated that the airplane had no dihedral in the wing, which lessened its lateral stability, and added that the wing would dip very quickly in a stall. He indicated that a 1,000-foot altitude loss would be normal for a recovery from the resultant spin. The airplane also exhibited adverse yaw tendencies, which required “lots of rudder attention.” The previous owner stated he had entered an inadvertent spin on several occasions while practicing aerodynamic stalls.

 

Flying Truths – 22 April 2014

The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, The filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any Group of animals I have ever seen.
Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!..
– Eleanor Roosevelt

Aviation Axioms from Bob Besco – 22 April 2014

Everyone blames bad luck, no one blames bad judgment

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